Filichia Insurance Agency
1703 S. Washington Av.
Titusville, FL 32780

321.269.1400

Fax: 321-264-9770

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of our frequently asked questions. If you have any other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us.

  1. Is foregoing car insurance illegal?
  2. Are there different types of car insurance?
  3. You need car insurance if you don't own a car?
  4. I have a car. How much auto insurance should I buy?
  5. What do personal details, like my martial status, have to do with car insurance?
  6. Why do car insurance companies care about my credit?
  7. Do red cars cost more to insure?
  8. What kind of car insurance discounts are there?
  9. How much does car insurance usually cost?
  10. Is there any other way to lower my car insurance premiums?
  11. Do I need rental car insurance?
  12. What does auto insurance cover?
  13. What happens if I lie about my driving history?
  14. Can I put anyone on my policy?
  15. What is an insurance deductible?
  16. Can I change my coverage whenever I want?
  17. Can an auto insurance company deny you service?
  18. My car is 20 years old. Will insurance still cover it?
  19. Which insurance company is the best?
  20. What are some practical things I can do to lower the cost of my homeowners insurance?
  21. What does Homeowners insurance cover?
  22. What is the difference between “actual cash value” and “replacement cost”?
  23. What factors should I consider when purchasing homeowners insurance?
  24. What are the policy limits (i.e., coverage limits) in the standard homeowners policy?
  25. Where and when is my personal property covered?
  26. What is a personal umbrella liability policy?
  27. How do I know if I need a personal umbrella liability policy?
Is foregoing car insurance illegal?

Yes, Because, most states have mandatory car insurance minimums. Florida is a Personal Injury Protection (PIP) state. It is also known as the  "No Fault Law. 

 



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Are there different types of car insurance?

Oh, yeah. Here are the big ones:

  • Bodily injury (BI) and property damage (PD) liability coverage, which pays for damage you cause to other people or their property
  • Personal injury protection (PIP), which pays for medical expenses and usually lost wages regardless of fault
  • Collision coverage, which pays for damage done to your car in a collision
  • Comprehensive coverage, which pays for damage done to your car in non-collisions (i.e., fire, vandalism, or theft).
  • Uninsured and underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, which protects you if you're in an accident and the driver at fault doesn’t have insurance.

There's also gap insurance, which covers the — you guessed it — gap between what your car is worth (what your insurer will pay if the car is totaled or stolen) and what you still owe on it.



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You need car insurance if you don't own a car?

If you rent or drive other people’s cars frequently, then, yes, you should look into a non-owner auto insurance policy, which provides basic liability coverage. Non-owner policies don't include collision or comprehensive coverage, because you don't need it. Remember, collision and comprehensive coverage pays for damage to your car and, in this scenario, you don't have one.



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I have a car. How much auto insurance should I buy?

You should buy as much car insurance coverage as you feel comfortable with and can afford. (We can help you compare car insurance quotes here.) Having said that, the price difference between a bare-bones policy and a robust policy is sometimes negligible.



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What do personal details, like my martial status, have to do with car insurance?

All insurers base their rates on risk. We're talking car insurance, so the company is primarily trying to determine how likely you are to get into an accident. Obviously, if you have a poor driving record or you're on the road all the time, the odds are less in your favor. But statistics show women get into fewer accidents than men as do married individuals versus single ones. Younger drivers, conversely, get into more accidents than older drivers. All that data on your demo can influence what insurers charge.



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Why do car insurance companies care about my credit?

Most insurers — and we're not just talking about auto insurance companies here — use some type of credit-based insurance score to help determine how risky a potential customer is. The practice is a bit controversial, which is why some states have laws against using it. But the general thinking behind insurer credit checks is: If someone is bad with their finances, they might be irresponsible in other areas of life, too. 



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Do red cars cost more to insure?

No. That's a myth. The make and model of a car impact your rates, given some cars are just more expensive than others. Take the Tesla Model S, for instance, which costs a ton to insure, regardless of color, because it's full of expensive parts.



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What kind of car insurance discounts are there?

Oh, there are a whole bunch. The big ones include good driver discounts (for going long enough without a moving violation); affiliation discounts (for belonging to a group, that partners with the insurer); low-mileage discounts (for, you know, low mileage) and car safety feature discounts (for having stuff like automatic brakes that assistance with collision avoidance systems). You can find a full list of there is a whole list if things. 



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How much does car insurance usually cost?

The average cost of car insurance in the U.S. is around $866 a year ($72 a month), according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. The averages in each state vary with New Jersey drivers paying the most ($1,264 a year) and Idaho drivers paying the least ($572).



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Is there any other way to lower my car insurance premiums?

There are two other methods that come immediately to mind. First, you could pay your premiums annually or semi-annually. Some car insurers offer anywhere from a 3% to 10% discount for doing so. The other thing you can consider is increasing your deductible. That's the amount of money you pay out of pocket before insurance kicks in, so you'd pay more in case of an accident, but your monthly premium would be lower.



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Do I need rental car insurance?

We can help you figure out if you need rental car insurance. The short take: If you don't have auto insurance, yes, you most likely need coverage. If you have robust car insurance, you might simply need a collision damage waiver as it’s the only way to ensure you won’t pay the rental company any damages in case of an accident. Of course, it gets more complicated from there. For the long take on call our office. 



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What does auto insurance cover?

Auto insurance covers you, your car and others involved in a vehicular accident.



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What happens if I lie about my driving history?

If you lie about your driving history, the DMV reports that you are committing what is known as “soft fraud.” If you do lie, the insurance company can deny you services and cancel your coverage. It is a Felony in Florida. 



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Can I put anyone on my policy?

You can include members of your household on your policy, but you must all live in the same household. 



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What is an insurance deductible?

An insurance deductible is the amount of money you pay after an accident before your insurance company pays for the remaining amount.



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Can I change my coverage whenever I want?

Yes, but you may be charged a cancellation fee. Usually standard and preferred policies prorate policy premiums. If you wait until the end of your policy, then you won’t be charged.



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Can an auto insurance company deny you service?

Yes, they can. If you have a DUI on your record, have bad credit or have caused a serious accident, you can be denied service.



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My car is 20 years old. Will insurance still cover it?

This depends on the shape of the vehicle. Typically, older cars are provided with less coverage because they are not worth very much money, and would likely be scrapped altogether in the case of an accident.



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Which insurance company is the best?
This depends entirely on your area and what type of coverage you are looking for. Discuss companies and coverage with our agents. 

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What are some practical things I can do to lower the cost of my homeowners insurance?

There are a number of things you can do to lower the cost of your homeowners insurance. The easiest thing to do is get a comprehensive review of your policy and needs from our agents.

It is not surprising to find quotes on homeowners insurance that vary by hundreds of dollars for the same coverage on the same home. When you shop, be careful to make sure each insurer is offering the same coverage.

Another way to lower the cost of your homeowners insurance is to look for any discounts that you may qualify for. For example, many insurers will offer a discount when you place both your automobile and homeowners insurance with them. Other times, insurers offer discounts if there are deadbolt exterior locks on all your doors, or if your home has a security system. Be sure to ask us about any discounts for which you may qualify

Another easy way to lower the cost of your homeowners insurance is to raise your deductible. Increasing your deductible from $500 to $1000 will lower your premium, sometimes by as much as five or ten percent.



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What does Homeowners insurance cover?

The typical homeowners policy has two main sections: Section I covers the property of the insured and Section II provides personal liability coverage for the insured. Almost anyone who owns or leases property has a need for this type of insurance. Usually, homeowners insurance is required by the lender to obtain a mortgage.

Make sure to read Understanding Your Homeowners Insurance Policy for more information.



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What is the difference between “actual cash value” and “replacement cost”?

Covered losses under a homeowners policy can be paid on either an actual cash value basis or on a replacement cost basis. When “actual cash value” is used, the policy owner is entitled to the depreciated value of the damaged property. Under the “replacement cost” coverage, the policy owner is reimbursed an amount necessary to replace the article with one of similar type and quality at current prices.



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What factors should I consider when purchasing homeowners insurance?

There are a number of factors you should consider when purchasing any product or service, and insurance is no different.

Here is a checklist of things you should consider when you purchase homeowners insurance:

·         Determine the amount and type of insurance that you need. The coverage limit of your house should equal 100% of its replacement cost. If your policy limit is less than 80% of the replacement cost of your home, any payment from your insurance company will be less than the full cost to replace your home – you’ll have to pay the rest out of your own pocket. Also, decide if the personal property and personal liability limits are adequate for your needs.

·         Determine which, if any, additional endorsements you want to add to your policy. For example, do you want the personal property replacement cost endorsement, an earthquake endorsement or a jewelry endorsement?

·         Once you have decided on the coverage you want in your homeowners insurance policy, consult us. We will be able to help you determine if there are any gaps in coverage you might not have been aware of, explain the details of the policy’s exclusions and limitations as well as recommend an insurance company that will live up to your expectations.



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What are the policy limits (i.e., coverage limits) in the standard homeowners policy?

Note: this answer is based on the Insurance Services Office’s HO-3 policy.

The dwelling and other structures on the premises are protected on an “all risks” basis up to the policy limits. “All risks” means that unless the policy specifically excludes the manner in which your home is damaged or destroyed, there is coverage. The policy limit for the dwelling is set by the policy owner at the time the insurance is purchased. The policy limit for the other structure is usually equal to 10% of the policy limit for the dwelling.

Losses to your personal property are covered on a “named perils” basis. “Named perils” means that you have coverage only when your property is damaged or destroyed in the manner specifically described in the policy. The policy limit on the coverage is usually equal to 50% of the policy limit on the dwelling. Limits for the coverage for the additional expenses that the policy owner may incur when the residence cannot be used because of an insured loss is equal to 20% of the policy limit on the dwelling.

The coverage limit on personal liability is determined by the policy owner at the time the policy is issued. The coverage limit on medical payments to others is usually set at $1000 per injured person. 



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Where and when is my personal property covered?

Personal property (except property that is specifically excluded) is covered anywhere in the world. For example, suppose that while traveling, you purchased a dresser and you want to ship it home. Your homeowners policy would provide coverage for the named perils while the dresser is in transit – even though the dresser has never been in your home before. Some newer policies may offer only 10% in transit now.Consult your policy. 



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What is a personal umbrella liability policy?

The personal umbrella liability policy is designed to increase your liability protection. This single policy acts as an “umbrella” over all of your other personal liability policies – home, auto, boat, RV, etc. – so you have a higher personal liability limit than what would otherwise be available. In certain circumstances, an umbrella policy may provide personal liability coverage that is otherwise excluded from your other policies. For example, an umbrella policy provides coverage anywhere in the world, whereas your auto policy usually provides coverage in the US and Canada only.



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How do I know if I need a personal umbrella liability policy?

It used to be that the only people who needed personal umbrella liability policies were wealthy individuals who had sizable amounts of personal assets that would be at risk in a lawsuit.

However, in our very litigious society, even individuals with modest incomes and assets are often subjects of large lawsuits. Since they are even less able than a wealthy individual to pay large damage awards, they recognize the need to have coverage limits greater than what can be obtained from their homeowner or auto policies.

 



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